A New Angle for Ataxia and ALS Research

Nov 6, 2018
Author: 
Jim Oldfield

Professor Karim Mekhail, Amanda Hall and Lauren OstrowskiProfessor Karim Mekhail, Amanda Hall and Lauren Ostrowski Research from the University of Toronto has shown that in some neurodegenerative diseases, two hallmarks of cell aging — protein aggregation and a type of DNA instability, previously thought to be unconnected — are linked.

The researchers used cellular models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinocerebellar ataxia and found that the gumming up of certain proteins undermines the stability of ribosomal DNA repeats — repetitive genetic sequences essential for manufacturing all proteins and cells.

“We found that protein aggregates shorten the lifespan of the cell by compromising the stability of the highly repetitive ribosomal DNA sequences,” says Professor Karim Mekhail, who holds the Canada Research Chair in Spatial Genome Organization in the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology. “That these two major mechanisms of cell aging are connected points to strategies that may hit two birds with one stone in neurodegeneration.”

The journal Communications Biology published the results yesterday.

Repetitive DNA sequences comprise over half of the genome in some organisms, and they are essential to cell function. But they are susceptible to re-organization, which can lead to chromosomal rearrangements, premature cell aging and disease.

Image by Roxanne OshidariTwo beasts of cellular aging, protein aggregation and genome instability, are one. Image by Roxanne Oshidari Mekhail and his team, including doctoral students Lauren Ostrowski and Amanda Hall, first found that trouble-making proteins — which emerge from repetitive DNA sequences called transposons — aggregate in yeast cells humanized with mutations found in patients suffering from ALS and ataxia. They then mapped how the aggregates destabilize ribosomal DNA repeats and lead to premature yeast cell aging, before confirming the findings in human cells.

The work took more than four years. “This story was full of surprises,” says Mekhail. “The findings may seem obvious in retrospect, but if you’d told us in the beginning that there was crosstalk between protein aggregation and destabilization of DNA, we’d have thought that was absurd. Lauren and Amanda really had to persevere.”

To identify new and urgently needed therapeutic approaches, the researchers are now testing if drugs that disrupt transposon protein aggregates restore genome stability and cell lifespan in various neurodegenerative diseases.

The research was funded by the Canada Research Chairs Program, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and the Ontario Ministry of Research and Innovation.

Feb 28 – Mar 29
Leading Transformation: Building Adaptive Capacity - Advanced Learning Program at IHPME
Course | 8:30am–5:00pm
Mar 25 RSI Speaker Series: Women and Brain Health
Other | 11:00am–12:00pm
Mar 26 Implementing Innovations
Workshop/Seminar | 5:00pm–7:00pm
Mar 27 1st Annual REC-Amend Symposium: Accessible BIPOC Mental Health Services
Symposium | 5:30pm–8:30pm
Apr 3 WebPac Training
Workshop/Seminar | 2:00pm–3:30pm
Apr
4 – 6
59th Annual Program for Practising Surgeons Update in General Surgery
Conference | 7:00am–5:30pm
Apr 4 19th Toronto Breast Surgery Symposium
Symposium | 7:15am–5:00pm

Tweets

UofT Medicine
@uoftmedicine
Robots in the OR: medical experts weigh in on robot-assisted surgery and what it means for healthcare https://t.co/E65B96Ypoq
UofT Medicine
@uoftmedicine
Got an idea for a start-up? Entrepreneurs & their early-stage startups at will soon have access to a new fina… https://t.co/ormVuM2rMI
UofT Medicine
@uoftmedicine
“It’s a very exciting time in science, with new developments expanding the realm of what we thought possible… we ar… https://t.co/3fGwcdGTmA

UofTMed Magazine

Have we lost the art of dying?

Sign up for your free digital copy.
Back to Top