Ontario Brain Institute Public Talk - The Potential of Data Sharing: What Data Means for Your Brain Health

Nov 26, 2020
|
6:30pm–7:30pm
Workshop/Seminar
Details

Imagine a world in which we can better care for people living with cerebral palsy, a world with tools to detect early signs and symptoms of a stroke, and a world where neurodiversity is understood. Together, we can build that world and improve brain health. And it starts with sharing data to accelerate research, improve our understanding of the brain, and find better diagnostic tools and treatment options for brain disorders.

Join us to learn about the possibilities of data sharing, the work currently underway to secure, link, and share healthcare data, and find out how you can join the cause.

About the Speakers:

Opening remarks by Dr. Mona Nemer, Chief Science Advisor of Canada.

Shelly Philip LaForest, a practicing Registered Nurse at The Hospital for Sick Children. She is a member of OBI’s Data Access Committee and Community Advisory Committee for EpLink, OBI’s epilepsy research program. As a caregiver to her three children - two of whom have epilepsy - Shelly believes data sharing can help accelerate discovery.

Dr. Sean Hill, the inaugural Director of the Krembil Centre for Neuroinformatics at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. As a member of the Advisory Committee for Brain-CODE - OBI’s neuroinformatics platform - Dr. Hill is a staunch advocate of data sharing on a global scale.

Dr. Richard Wintle, the Assistant Director of The Centre for Applied Genomics at The Hospital for Sick Children and the Associate Scientific Director of CP-NET, OBI’s cerebral palsy research program. Dr. Wintle’s research focuses on the genetics of neurodevelopmental disorders such as cerebral palsy – he believes in open science and hopes that other researchers will follow suit.

Dr. Holly Longstaff, the Director of Privacy and Access, PHSA Research and New Initiatives at the Provincial Health Services Authority. Dr. Longstaff helps guide the development and implementation of privacy solutions and advocates for the responsible use of data in research.

Moderated by Dr. Dan Riskin

This is a public talk hosted by the The Ontario Brain Institute (OBI) as part of their 2020/21 series of OBI Public Talks.
 

Location
Online
Contact
Ontario Brain Institute
647-847-9000
2020-11-26 23:30:00 2020-11-27 00:30:00 UTC Ontario Brain Institute Public Talk - The Potential of Data Sharing: What Data Means for Your Brain Health Imagine a world in which we can better care for people living with cerebral palsy, a world with tools to detect early signs and symptoms of a stroke, and a world where neurodiversity is understood. Together, we can build that world and improve brain health. And it starts with sharing data to accelerate research, improve our understanding of the brain, and find better diagnostic tools and treatment options for brain disorders.Join us to learn about the possibilities of data sharing, the work currently underway to secure, link, and share healthcare data, and find out how you can join the cause.About the Speakers:Opening remarks by Dr. Mona Nemer, Chief Science Advisor of Canada.Shelly Philip LaForest, a practicing Registered Nurse at The Hospital for Sick Children. She is a member of OBI’s Data Access Committee and Community Advisory Committee for EpLink, OBI’s epilepsy research program. As a caregiver to her three children - two of whom have epilepsy - Shelly believes data sharing can help accelerate discovery.Dr. Sean Hill, the inaugural Director of the Krembil Centre for Neuroinformatics at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. As a member of the Advisory Committee for Brain-CODE - OBI’s neuroinformatics platform - Dr. Hill is a staunch advocate of data sharing on a global scale.Dr. Richard Wintle, the Assistant Director of The Centre for Applied Genomics at The Hospital for Sick Children and the Associate Scientific Director of CP-NET, OBI’s cerebral palsy research program. Dr. Wintle’s research focuses on the genetics of neurodevelopmental disorders such as cerebral palsy – he believes in open science and hopes that other researchers will follow suit.Dr. Holly Longstaff, the Director of Privacy and Access, PHSA Research and New Initiatives at the Provincial Health Services Authority. Dr. Longstaff helps guide the development and implementation of privacy solutions and advocates for the responsible use of data in research.Moderated by Dr. Dan RiskinThis is a public talk hosted by the The Ontario Brain Institute (OBI) as part of their 2020/21 series of OBI Public Talks.  Online info@braininstitute.ca