Faculty of Medicine

2019 Macallum Lecture

May 1, 2019
|
3:00pm–4:00pm
Lecture
Details

We are excited to announce that Dr. Richard D. Palmiter from the University of Washington and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute will deliver our Macallum Lecture 2019!

Dr. Palmiter is internationally renowned for his work on specific neuronal populations that control appetite. Interestingly, he is considered by many to be the "founding father" of transgenic mouse technology from his seminal paper on growth hormone transgenic mice in Nature in 1982. He currently studies the neurons that reside in the parabrachial nucleus that mediate virtually every threat examined, including real threats (pain, itch, food poisoning) to potential threats (novel food or cues associated with pain). These neurons have been shown to mediate the unconditioned stimulus in classic taste- and fear-conditioning experiments. His lab uses innovative genetic and viral transduction techniques to discern neural circuits that control mouse behavior. Reception to Follow Lecture.

Location
JJR Macleod Auditorium
Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto
Toronto
M5S 1A8
Contact
Jenny Katsoulakos
416-978-2674
2019-05-01 19:00:00 2019-05-01 20:00:00 UTC 2019 Macallum Lecture We are excited to announce that Dr. Richard D. Palmiter from the University of Washington and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute will deliver our Macallum Lecture 2019! Dr. Palmiter is internationally renowned for his work on specific neuronal populations that control appetite. Interestingly, he is considered by many to be the "founding father" of transgenic mouse technology from his seminal paper on growth hormone transgenic mice in Nature in 1982. He currently studies the neurons that reside in the parabrachial nucleus that mediate virtually every threat examined, including real threats (pain, itch, food poisoning) to potential threats (novel food or cues associated with pain). These neurons have been shown to mediate the unconditioned stimulus in classic taste- and fear-conditioning experiments. His lab uses innovative genetic and viral transduction techniques to discern neural circuits that control mouse behavior. Reception to Follow Lecture. Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto - JJR Macleod Auditorium discovery.commons@utoronto.ca